CALEA Preserves 1968 Law

In 1994, the United States Congress approved the Communications for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA). The regulations were intended to preserve a wiretapping law put in place in 1968 and allow wiretapping over digital phone networks. CALEA requires telecommunications carriers to modify their equipment, facilities, and services to aid surveillance capabilities. Initially there was some question as to whether this would apply to VoIP—Voice Over Internet Protocol service—but in 2005 the courts ruled that indeed VoIP must comply with CALEA.

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Telecoms Required to Abide by CALEA

All telecommunications companies as defined by the Communications Assistance For Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) must maintain updated system securities plans with the Federal Communications Commission. Internet providers and VOIP service providers were required to submit their initial plan by March 2007 and now must provide updated material as mandated by CALEA. Virtually all common carriers and telecommunications companies are subject to the regulations under CALEA. This means that all VoIP phone service, including toll free providers using VoIP, is subjected to the surveillance provisions under CALEA.

Information on the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA)

In 1994 as a means of keeping up with emerging digital technology, the United States Congress approved the Communications for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA). The regulations were intended to preserve a wiretapping law put in place in 1968 and allow wiretapping over digital phone networks.

Read more here.

Breaking Down the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA)

As part of an investigation, law enforcement agencies or intelligence services can tap into a phone call or trace the origin of the call without advising any of the parties involved in the communications.

This means that all VoIP phone service, including toll free providers using VoIP, is subjected to the surveillance provisions under CALEA.

Read more here.

What is the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA)?

As part of an investigation, law enforcement agencies or intelligence services can tap into a phone call or trace the origin of the call without advising any of the parties involved in the communications.

This means that all VoIP phone service, including toll free providers using VoIP, is subjected to the surveillance provisions under CALEA.

Read more here.

A Brief Explanation of the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA)

Virtually all common carriers and telecommunications companies are subject to the regulations under CALEA. This means all telephone communications can be monitored as part of legal, warranted, surveillance by law enforcement agencies. However, fiber optic communications are a possible exception for some wiretapping purposes because detecting transmission through the fiber optic cables is very difficult.

Read more here.

Report on the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA)

CALEA requires telecommunications carriers to modify their equipment, facilities, and services to aid surveillance capabilities. Initially there was some question as to whether this would apply to VoIP—Voice Over Internet Protocol service—but in 2005 the courts ruled that indeed VoIP must comply with CALEA.

Read more here.

U.S. Congress Attempts to Keep Up with Emerging Technologies

Virtually all common carriers and telecommunications companies are subject to the regulations under CALEA. This means all telephone communications can be monitored as part of legal, warranted, surveillance by law enforcement agencies. However, fiber optic communications are a possible exception for some wiretapping purposes because detecting transmission through the fiber optic cables is very difficult.

Read more here.

All About CALEA

As part of an investigation, law enforcement agencies or intelligence services can tap into a phone call or trace the origin of the call without advising any of the parties involved in the communications.

Read more here.

What is CALEA?

CALEA requires telecommunications carriers to modify their equipment, facilities, and services to aid surveillance capabilities. Initially there was some question as to whether this would apply to VoIP—Voice Over Internet Protocol service—but in 2005 the courts ruled that indeed VoIP must comply with CALEA.

Read more here.