Phone Service Embargo in the U.S.

Telecommunications industry sources now say an unthinkable embargo on new toll free phone service in the United States is a real possibility within the next year. Facing a severe shortage of available 800-numbers, a skyrocketing demand for toll free service and an emerging black market for 800 numbers, insiders say officials feel they are left with no choice but to impose an embargo.

Recent reports have referred to the situation as the ‘the perfect storm” meaning the shortage of numbers, the soaring demand, and the failure of the federal government to release reserved numbers have all collided to create a situation in which rationing, an embargo or even a complete depletion of 800 numbers is possible.

More than two-thirds of the available supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are taken and millions of new subscribers are registering every year. Business owners who wait much longer to obtain a number might find themselves out of luck. In a competitive market, a toll free number is a valuable commodity for every business.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has a stockpile of new 855 numbers reserved to address the shortage but these numbers are not expected to be released anytime soon. With available 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers at all all-time low, insiders fear the numbers will run completely dry, hurting business and creating an out-of-control black market.

Experts say that consumers recognize that many of the advantages of 1-800 numbers outweigh standard local phone service. Toll free service is becoming increasingly common with parents wishing to keep in close contact with children and teens. Businesses with a 1-800 number can see almost instant increases in sales, word of mouth referrals, and a decrease in product returns and the FCC reports that toll free service is a “proven” marketing tool.

Industry insiders are recommending that anyone wishing to obtain a toll free number secure one immediately. There are an average of 8,000 new toll free numbers registered each day. With a limited number of numerical possibilities, the finite supply is nearly expended but numbers can safely and rapidly be obtained through providers such as AT&T, Verizon,  or Qwest.

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Toll-free Phone Number Supply Expected To Be Cut Short.

Thirteen years after the federal government rationed the dwindling supply of toll free numbers, reports are circulating that rationing will once again be implemented. Severe shortages of 800 numbers are forcing these extreme measures as a means of protecting the limited remaining supply.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has a stockpile of new 855 numbers reserved to address the shortage but these numbers are not expected to be released anytime soon. With available 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers at all all-time low, insiders fear the numbers will run completely dry, hurting business and creating an out-of-control black market.

Experts say that consumers recognize that many of the advantages of 1-800 numbers outweigh standard local phone service. Toll free service is becoming increasingly common with parents wishing to keep in close contact with children and teens. Businesses with a 1-800 number can see almost instant increases in sales, word of mouth referrals, and a decrease in product returns. Standard local phone service does not provide any of these advantages.

Government officials say something must be done to offset the problem—this means a possible rationing program and a tough crackdown on the burgeoning black market. Attempts to profit from the illegal sale of 800, 888, 877 and 866 numbers are in response to rapidly dwindling supplies. As with any commodity in high demand, a black market for toll free numbers has emerged in the United States, sending regulators scrambling to control the illegal sales of valuable 800 numbers.

Available toll free numbers are at an all-time low and experts advise anyone interested in obtaining an 800 number should act now. Thousands of toll free numbers are registered each day and with a limited number of possibilities, the finite supply is nearly expended.

The most expedient way to secure an 800 number is to contact a reliable service provider such as Qwest, AT&T, or Verizon.

Also Read:

The Toll Free Ration Bill

Proposed Ration Bil

800 Numbers Running Low

Why do toll-free phone companies require a bill copy to transfer your 800 number?

If you currently control your own 1-800 toll free phone number (or 888/877/866) and choose to transfer your toll free number to another company (also called ‘porting your number’) the company you are  ransferring it to will require a bill copy, but why?

The answer is simple; it’s for the security of three entities:

1. The phone company
2. You
3. Every other person who has a toll free number

Recently there have been reports of some rogue toll free companies that claim you don’t need a bill copy, or that if a bill copy is requested you should dispute having to send one.  That information is inaccurate and skewed for the following reasons:

Legitimate phone companies require a copy of your bill to port-in an 1-800 phone number.  Conversely, there are also illegitimate “toll free companies” in quotes because they are often shady, underhanded and deceitful shadowy entities lurking with no fixed address hoping to acquire your toll free phone number under their control.  If you are a legitimate toll-free user, it’s important that you don’t fall into their trap.  Oftentimes, upto 90% of their phone service is being used by scammers worldwide that buy from a shady phone company because it’s easier to get away with breaking the law and doing the kind of stuff that normal phone companies proactively prohibit; like Nigerian Bank Scams, or the phone number
used on the websites of Viagra bulk email SPAM.

If the phone company doesn’t have safe procedures for verifying the end-user of a toll free phone number before they begin transferring it, then it would be YOUR toll free number being put at risk.  What if someone tries to transfer YOUR 1-800 number  without your consent either on purpose or on accident, if the phone company doesn’t verify the bill copy, the phone company could be held liable for damages, AND it could severely disrupt the business of the toll-free user and their callers.  No legitimate phone company wants to be a part of causing that, it’s an all around bad situation for everybody.  The bottom line is that phone companies that require bill copies have no liability because they create an environment that has no liabilities; the other “phone companies” create glitches and cause problems.

Toll-free Ration Bill Reintroduced With Changes.

Rumors are swirling that an amended proposal to ration the remaining supply of toll free phone numbers has been re-introduced to officials at the 800 Service Management Systems (SMS/800). Earlier this year, insiders reported that a similar rationing bill was narrowly defeated.

If approved, this would be the second time toll free numbers were rationed. The federal government rationed coveted 800 numbers in 1995 until the new 888 pre-fix was introduced a year later. Industry insiders are eagerly awaiting the outcome of this latest rationing proposal. Telecommunications experts are reportedly concerned that a toll free number ration could delay new phone service applications in the midst of one of the worst U.S. economic downturns in decades.

To overcome shortages of 1-800 numbers in the past, 888 and 877 were introduced in 1996 and 1998 respectively. Then, in 2000 the 866 numbers debuted. But toll free numbers have become such a valuable commodity that the stock is once again depleted.

The U.S. supply of available 1-800 numbers, dwindling for years, is now nearly depleted. Toll free numbers enable callers to reach businesses, organizations, and non-profits without having to pay for the call. This marketing tool has been so successful that the available numbers are shrinking while demand is growing at unprecedented rates.

Growing concern about the limited stock of 800 numbers is creating an even higher demand. The FCC cites toll free service as a “proven” marketing tool for increasing and sustaining business. In fact, studies show that telephone orders can increase up to 60 percent and word of mouth referrals can rise by 200 percent. American adults report that they make an average of 60 toll free calls per year.

Experts recommend that anyone wishing to obtain a, 866 toll free number secure one immediately. With a limited number of toll free possibilities, the finite numerical supply is nearly expended. Companies like AT&T and Verizon can quickly secure a number for any subscriber, then offer low rates, a variety of services and reliable fiber optic connections.

Toll-free Phone Service Applications Expected To Rise

Heeding recent warnings about the rapid decline of 800 numbers, subscribers are applying for toll free service at record rates. A steady stream of requests are pouring in for toll free 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers and applications are expected to continue to rise this year.

In recent years, an average of 8,000 new toll free numbers have been doled out each day from the main database of available numbers, managed by the 800 Service Management System (SMS/800). With 800 numbers bursting in popularity while the supply of available numbers shrinks, insiders say the number of daily applications could double by the end of the year.

For several months now, industry insiders have been advising anyone looking for a toll free number to secure one immediately. The warnings are apparently sinking in– applications for 800 numbers are at an all-time high as subscribers try to obtain a number while there are still some remaining.

Making the situation worse, hopes that the new 855 numbers would soon be released have been dashed as insiders report the launch of the numbers may be held off until 2011. Meanwhile more than two-thirds of available numbers have been taken and millions of new numbers are being registered each year.

The popularity of the 1-800 number, introduced in the late 1960s, led the FCC to add the new pre-fixes 888 and 877 in the mid-1990s. When availability of those numbers became scarce in 2000, the 866 pre-fix was added to overcome the shortage. Now, eight years later, the stockpile is once again low despite a recent mass deactivation of unused 800 numbers.

In the race to submit an application for toll free phone service, advisors say the most effective and affordable way to obtain an 800 number before supplies run out is to contact a reliable toll free service provider. A few examples are Verizon, or Qwest. These providers can quickly assist subscribers in finding a quality toll free number.

Toll-free Ration Bill Suffers Defeat at SMS800.

By a narrow defeat, telecommunications insiders say a proposal to ration the limited supply of existing toll free numbers has suffered a loss at 800 Services management System (SMS/800).

Rumors that a rationing program for the few remaining 800 numbers was imminent circulated through the telecommunications industry earlier this month. Supplies of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are so depleted that availability is at an all-time low. But some say rationing the numbers, as the federal government did in 1995, is not the answer and could have a negative impact on the business community.

Once used primarily by big businesses, the 800, 888, 877, and 866 toll free numbers are now popular with small businesses, charities, churches, and for personal use. Toll free service has become a staple of all successful businesses. Demand has grown rapidly however the supply of numbers has remained stagnant. Despite this shortage, reserved 855 numbers are not expected to be released by the FCC for several years. Until a new pre-fix is launched, which could take years, it appears the race is on to secure the remaining numbers.

According to the FCC, toll free numbers are becoming increasingly popular for business and personal use. The supply of disconnected numbers is low because 800 numbers are extremely effective in helping businesses thrive. Toll free numbers increase market reach, enhance customer confidence, establish recognition of brand image, and sustain businesses during a weak economy.

Industry insiders are recommending that anyone wishing to obtain a toll free number secure one immediately. There are an average of 8,000 new toll free numbers registered each day. With a limited number of numerical possibilities, the finite supply is nearly expended.

The best way to obtain a toll free number before rationing is imposed, or before supply runs out completely, is to contact a reliable toll free service provider that has access to the database of available numbers. Verizon and Qwest are providers that will assist subscribers in finding a quality toll free number at a very low cost.

Toll-free Number Ration May Deny or Delay New Phone Service Applications.

Facing an extreme dearth of 800 numbers, telecommunications experts are now concerned that a toll free number ration could delay new phone service applications. And in the midst of an economic meltdown, U.S. business owners could not imagine worse news.

Rationing is not a new concept. After 800 numbers ran dry in 1995 the federal government rationed numbers until the 888 numbers were launched a year later. The rationing of toll free numbers could a tighter squeeze on U.S. businesses, already in trouble with a shaky economy. Toll free service is essential for new companies, start-ups and any business trying to get a competitive edge. Insiders are concerned that if the existing available 800 numbers are rationed, some businesses could be doomed.

The severe shortage of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers already has the toll free service industry feeling uneasy. Now that rumors are circulating that rationing of numbers is about to begin, experts say anyone who wants to obtain a toll free number had better act now.

To overcome shortages of 1-800 numbers in the past, 888 and 877 were introduced in 1996 and 1998 respectively. Then, in 2000 the 866 numbers debuted. But toll free numbers have become such a valuable commodity that the stock is once again depleted.

The value of a 1-800 number has become a necessity for any business. Toll free numbers allow callers to reach businesses, organizations and even friends and relatives without being charged for the call. A toll free number lends credibility to any business, enhances customer service, and increases customer confidence. There are no additional installations needed for a 1-800 number and the calls can be routed to any cell phone, landline, or fax. Studies show that sales can double and word of mouth referrals can increase by as much as 200% making toll free service indispensable for business.

Advisors say the best way to obtain a toll free number before the supply runs out is to use a reliable toll free service provider that has access to the database of available numbers. For example, Verizon, or Qwest will assist subscribers in finding a quality toll free number at a very low cost.