The Disappearing Act

Why are toll free numbers disappearing? This isn’t going over well with business owners especially since the delay of the newest 855 toll free area code’s coming out.

Learn more about this here.

800 Numbers Going the Way of the Buffalo

With the fixed amount of available 800 numbers shrinking fast, subscribers who waited to secure toll free service are now learning why it is so difficult to obtain a number.

Industry insiders say the soaring popularity of toll free service combined with the failure of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to release additional numbers have created a tight supply of 800 numbers in heavy demand.

Read more here.

FCC Warns, Tricky Language Can Land You in an Illegal Deal

Following the emergence of a black market for valuable toll free numbers, including catchy vanity numbers, sources say federal authorities are cracking down on the illegal sales of 800 numbers.

Insiders say to avoid being caught in an undercover investigation and facing hefty fines from the Federal Communications Commission, anyone interested in obtaining an 800 number should deal with reputable service providers such as Qwest, or AT&T.

Read more here.

When Transferring Your Toll Free Number a Bill Copy is a MUST

Legitimate phone companies require a copy of your bill to port-in an 1-800 phone number. Conversely, there are also illegitimate “toll free companies” in quotes because they are often shady, underhanded and deceitful shadowy entities lurking with no fixed address hoping to acquire your toll free phone number under their control. If you are a legitimate toll-free user, it’s important that you don’t fall into their trap. Oftentimes, upto 90% of their phone service is being used by scammers worldwide that buy from a shady phone company because it’s easier to get away with breaking the law and doing the kind of stuff that normal phone companies proactively prohibit; like Nigerian Bank Scams, or the phone number
used on the websites of Viagra bulk email SPAM.

Read more here.

Why do toll free phone companies require an actual bill copy to transfer your 800 number?

Legitimate phone companies require a copy of your bill to port-in an 1-800 phone number. Conversely, there are also illegitimate “toll free companies” in quotes because they are often shady, underhanded and deceitful shadowy entities lurking with no fixed address hoping to acquire your toll free phone number under their control. If you are a legitimate toll-free user, it’s important that you don’t fall into their trap.

Read more here.

T.A.C. Update on Reintroduced Rationing Bill

Growing concern about the limited stock of 800 numbers is creating an even higher demand. The FCC cites toll free service as a “proven” marketing tool for increasing and sustaining business. In fact, studies show that telephone orders can increase up to 60 percent and word of mouth referrals can rise by 200 percent. American adults report that they make an average of 60 toll free calls per year.

FCC Narrowing Gaze Upon Number Hoarders

According to the FCC, hoarding and warehousing numbers is prohibited and punishable with severe fines.

Along with hoarding, the outright sale of specific toll free numbers is likewise illegal. Some crafty entrepreneurs have attempted to skirt the regulations by “leasing” or “renting” numbers. But industry insiders say the crackdown on illegal use of toll free numbers is aimed at this practice too.

Read more here.

855 A Success. Now, We Wait For 844 Numbers.

The new 855 toll free phone numbers are already a big success. Next, we look to the release of the 844 numbers. These should be released within the next 12-18 months, further addressing the shortage of the toll free number supply. With drafting of the release schedule already in place, these newest toll free supplies will be welcomed by millions of subscribers and consumers.

FCC Fines Man For Attempting To Sell 800 Number

The owner of a valuable 800 toll free number who attempted to illegally sell the number to an undercover agent faces stiff fines according to regulations set by the Federal Communications Commission.

By law, phone numbers cannot be sold or brokered. In 1997, the FCC made the sale of 800 numbers illegal. Because of the short supply of available numbers, complaints were pouring in at that time that price gouging for the popular numbers was becoming a common practice. The FCC acted quickly, prohibiting sales.

Read more here.

Government Officials Say Something Must Be Done

Thirteen years after the federal government rationed the dwindling supply of toll free numbers, reports are circulating that rationing will once again be implemented. Severe shortages of 800 numbers are forcing these extreme measures as a means of protecting the limited remaining supply.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has a stockpile of new 855 numbers reserved to address the shortage but these numbers are not expected to be released anytime soon. With available 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers at all all-time low, insiders fear the numbers will run completely dry, hurting business and creating an out-of-control black market.

Read more here.