Business Owners Scramble

Toll free numbers were introduced in 1967. By the 1980s, nearly half of all long distance calls would be toll free. Today, 98 percent of adults say they regularly use toll free numbers. Meanwhile, the supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are at an all-time low. More than two-thirds of the available numbers are taken and there are no immediate plans by the Federal Communications Commission to introduce a new pre-fix. With toll free numbers being lost to businesses looking to increase sales it looks like everyone’s scrambling to secure a toll free before they’re all gone. Get more information here!

Rationing Isn’t Just for Food

Facing an extreme dearth of 800 numbers, telecommunications experts are now concerned that a toll free number ration could delay new phone service applications. And in the midst of an economic meltdown, U.S. business owners could not imagine worse news. Read more on this rationing here.

Toll Free Service Rumors

Rumors are swirling that an amended proposal to ration the remaining supply of toll free phone numbers has been re-introduced to officials at the 800 Service Management Systems (SMS/800). Earlier this year, insiders reported that a similar rationing bill was narrowly defeated. Get more needed information here.

Is There a Toll Free Left For Me?

Many people are asking themselves if they will be able to get a new toll free number. It’s hard to tell; times are tough. Read more here.

Toll Free Sales on the Up and Up

Federal agencies have been cracking down on the illegal sale of 800 numbers and the hoarding, or stockpiling, of numbers by service providers and subscribers. This oversight is intended to help free up some of the numbers for new subscribers. Get some additional information here.

It’s Up to You

The force behind the demand for toll-free numbers is not only the traditional business use: a growing market is comprised of residential customers. If rationing is implemented, obtaining a new toll free number will be more difficult than ever before. Read more here.

Once Again, Rationing Bill Is Narrowly Defeated

By a narrow defeat, telecommunications insiders say a proposal to ration the limited supply of existing toll free numbers has suffered a loss at 800 Services management System (SMS/800).

Rumors that a rationing program for the few remaining 800 numbers was imminent circulated through the telecommunications industry earlier this month. Supplies of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are so depleted that availability is at an all-time low. But some say rationing the numbers, as the federal government did in 1995, is not the answer and could have a negative impact on the business community.

Read more here.

SMS/800 Rejects Current Plans to Ration

Supplies of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are so depleted that availability is at an all-time low. But some say rationing the numbers, as the federal government did in 1995, is not the answer and could have a negative impact on the business community.

Once used primarily by big businesses, the 800, 888, 877, and 866 toll free numbers are now popular with small businesses, charities, churches, and for personal use. Toll free service has become a staple of all successful businesses. Demand has grown rapidly however the supply of numbers has remained stagnant. Despite this shortage, reserved 855 numbers are not expected to be released by the FCC for several years.

Read more here.

If Rationing Bill Passes New Service Applications May Be Delayed or Denied

Facing an extreme dearth of 800 numbers, telecommunications experts are now concerned that a toll free number ration could delay new phone service applications. And in the midst of an economic meltdown, U.S. business owners could not imagine worse news.

Read more here.

Toll Free Quotas May Be Implemented

Rumors of a rationing program have subscribers scrambling to obtain numbers, creating an even more limited supply.

The federal government rationed coveted 800 numbers in 1995 until the new 888 pre-fix was introduced a year later. But the U.S. supply of available 1-800 numbers, dwindling for years, is again nearly depleted. Toll free numbers enable callers to reach businesses, organizations, and non-profits without having to pay for the call.

Read more here.