Toll Free Service Rumors

Rumors are swirling that an amended proposal to ration the remaining supply of toll free phone numbers has been re-introduced to officials at the 800 Service Management Systems (SMS/800). Earlier this year, insiders reported that a similar rationing bill was narrowly defeated. Get more needed information here.

Is There a Toll Free Left For Me?

Many people are asking themselves if they will be able to get a new toll free number. It’s hard to tell; times are tough. Read more here.

Rumors of Toll Free Rationing Linger

In the telecommunications industry, we are once again hearing rumors of toll free rationing. The federal government rationed 800 numbers in 1995 until the new 888 pre-fix was introduced a year later. Now, the supply of available 1-800 numbers is again nearly depleted. This marketing tool has been so successful that the available numbers are decreasing while demand is growing at unprecedented rates. If rationing is implemented, obtaining a new toll free number will be more difficult than ever before.

Discussions Focus On Supply Issues

The debate about toll free phone service continues. There has been a lot of discussion about concerns that the supply of available 1-800 numbers is nearly exhausted. There have not been any new toll free numbers introduced in the past nine years and an estimated 8,000 numbers or so are assigned each day. With demand high and supplies low telecommunications leaders are worried that this will create a real economic problem for United States businesses. Others argue that the problem is not too bad, yet. The debate continues.

800 Rationing Forseen

In the telecommunications industry, we are once again hearing rumors of toll free rationing. The federal government rationed 800 numbers in 1995 until the new 888 pre-fix was introduced a year later. Now, the supply of available 1-800 numbers is again nearly depleted. This marketing tool has been so successful that the available numbers are decreasing while demand is growing at unprecedented rates. If rationing is implemented, obtaining a new toll free number will be more difficult than ever before.

Toll Free Supply Debate Continues

The debate about toll free phone service continues. There has been a lot of discussion about concerns that the supply of available 1-800 numbers is nearly exhausted. There have not been any new toll free numbers introduced in the past nine years and an estimated 8,000 numbers or so are assigned each day. With demand high and supplies low telecommunications leaders are worried that this will create a real economic problem for United States businesses. Others argue that the problem is not too bad, yet. The debate continues.

Toll Free Rationing – Say What?

Facing an extreme dearth of 800 numbers, telecommunications experts are now concerned that a toll free number ration could delay new phone service applications. And in the midst of an economic meltdown, U.S. business owners could not imagine worse news.

Get the skinny here.

Embargo Implentation?

More than two-thirds of the available supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are taken and millions of new subscribers are registering every year. Business owners who wait much longer to obtain a number might find themselves out of luck. In a competitive market, a toll free number is a valuable commodity for every business. Get the skinny here!

Much Discussion Over Toll Free Shortages, No Answers

The debate about toll free phone service continues. There has been a lot of discussion about concerns that the supply of available 1-800 numbers is nearly exhausted. There have not been any new toll free numbers introduced in the past nine years and an estimated 8,000 numbers or so are assigned each day. With demand high and supplies low telecommunications leaders are worried that this will create a real economic problem for United States businesses. Others argue that the problem is not too bad, yet. The debate continues.

Toll Free Rationing Looms Ahead

In the telecommunications industry, we are once again hearing rumors of toll free rationing. The federal government rationed 800 numbers in 1995 until the new 888 pre-fix was introduced a year later. Now, the supply of available 1-800 numbers is again nearly depleted. This marketing tool has been so successful that the available numbers are decreasing while demand is growing at unprecedented rates. If rationing is implemented, obtaining a new toll free number will be more difficult than ever before.