Toll Frees Get Sticky

Following the emergence of a black market for valuable toll free numbers, including catchy vanity numbers, sources say federal authorities are cracking down on the illegal sales of 800 numbers.
Learn more information to protect yourself here.

The Patriot Act in Action

Has the government gone too far with their so called “regulations” (or lack there of) on phone tapping? If you are asking yourself why the government might want to tap lil’ ‘ol you and just forget about it… Don’t, because you’re in for a big surprise. Read more here.

Government Money Spent on Crackdown

Is it worth spending government money to crack down on people making the illegal sale of a toll free number? Many people are torn on the issue. One wonders how high the cost of these monitorings is and if the shake down is actually worth it. To get more information on this click here.

FCC Mandates Faster Porting of Telephone Numbers

The Federal Communications Commission has voted to mandate landline phone companies to move faster when their subscribers request moving their phone number to a rival service. The commission will require companies to transfer, or “port,” landline phone numbers within one business day. Wireless numbers are typically ported within one day — in some cases within hours — and the FCC has determined that landline companies should move just as quickly.

The FCC wants procedures developed within about three months. The carriers will then have nine months to comply. Smaller carriers will get an extra six months, for a total of about a year and a half before the new rules will be set in motion.

FCC Warns, Tricky Language Can Land You in an Illegal Deal

Following the emergence of a black market for valuable toll free numbers, including catchy vanity numbers, sources say federal authorities are cracking down on the illegal sales of 800 numbers.

Insiders say to avoid being caught in an undercover investigation and facing hefty fines from the Federal Communications Commission, anyone interested in obtaining an 800 number should deal with reputable service providers such as Qwest, or AT&T.

Read more here.

FCC Reviews Use of Toll Free Numbers

The FCC has a long history of reviewing legislation with regard to the use of toll free. For instance, the Telecommunications Act of 1996 amended section 228 to impose more stringent restrictions on the use of toll-free numbers to charge consumers for information services. On July 11, 1996, the Commission amended its rules governing interstate pay-per-call (900 numbers) and other information services to address abusive practices that threatened public confidence in toll-free numbers and left telephone subscribers vulnerable to unexpected charges for calls and information services.

Fair Distribution is Rule of Law

In March 1998, the FCC ordered the fair distribution of vanity toll free numbers. The Commission concluded that assigning vanity numbers would be on a first-come, first-served basis to ensure fair allocation of numbers. The FCC decided that “a first-come, first-served process is also the most efficient method for assigning toll free numbers because it is the most easily administered and least expensive way to allocate numbers.” The FCC also announced that the the first-come, first-served system avoids disputes among subscribers over who is entitled to a particular number.