FCC Crack Down

Illegally making the sale of a toll free number can cost you… BIG. By law, phone numbers cannot be sold or brokered. In 1997, the FCC made the sale of 800 numbers illegal. Because of the short supply of available numbers, complaints were pouring in at that time that price gouging for the popular numbers was becoming a common practice. The FCC acted quickly, prohibiting sales.

Read more here.

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A Reminder About Triggerfish

Courts in recent years have been raising the evidentiary bar law enforcement agents must meet in order to obtain historical cell phone records that reveal information about a target’s location. But documents obtained by civil liberties groups under a Freedom of Information Act request suggest that “triggerfish” technology can be used to pinpoint cell phones without involving cell phone providers at all.

Read more here.

A Brief Reminder About Triggerfish Technology and It’s Applications

As one of the documents intended to provide guidance for DOJ employees explains, triggerfish can be deployed “without the user knowing about it, and without involving the cell phone provider.” That may be significant because the legal rulings requiring law enforcement to meet a high “probable cause” standard before acquiring cell location records have, thus far, pertained to requests for information from providers, pursuant to statutes such as the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) and the Stored Communications Act.

Toll Free Number Aims to Stop Underage Drinking

News Update:

Omaha (KPTM) – Underage drinking is a problem that’s been going on for quite sometime.

Now, Nebraska has a tip line designed to turn in youngsters who may be part of that problem.

But do parents and kids think it will help.

Read more here.

Toll Free Number Issued to Curb Underage Drinking

Randy Yank knows his daughters Megan and Lindsey are faced with temptation each day, especially when it comes to alcohol.

“I’m shocked at some of the things I hear. I wasn’t perfect or anything, but it’s a lot worse now than it ever was when I was in High School,” said Yank.

Although Randy’s daughters aren’t in high school yet, they know underage drinking is not the way to go.

That’s why the sisters both agree that a new hotline designed to turn kids in is the right way to go.

Read more here.

FOIA Documents Show Feds Can Lojack Mobile Phones Without Help From Telcoms

Perhaps surprisingly, it’s only with the passage of the USA PATRIOT Act in 2001 that the government has needed any kind of court order to use triggerfish. While previously, the statutory language governing pen register or trap-and-trace orders did not appear to cover location tracking technology. Under the updated definition, these explicitly include any “device or process which records or decodes dialing, routing, addressing, and signaling information.”

Read more here.

CALEA, At It Again

As part of an investigation, law enforcement agencies or intelligence services can tap into a phone call or trace the origin of the call without advising any of the parties involved in the communications. Get the CALEA information here.

NHSO Establishes Toll Free Hotline to Curb Underage Drinking

Omaha (KPTM) – Underage drinking is a problem that’s been going on for quite sometime.

Now, Nebraska has a tip line designed to turn in youngsters who may be part of that problem.

Read more here.

FOIA Docs Show Feds Can Track Mobiles Without the Help of Telecoms

Courts in recent years have been raising the evidentiary bar law enforcement agents must meet in order to obtain historical cell phone records that reveal information about a target’s location. But documents obtained by civil liberties groups under a Freedom of Information Act request suggest that “triggerfish” technology can be used to pinpoint cell phones without involving cell phone providers at all.

Read more here.

Triggerfish: Concerning or Useful Tool?

The Justice Department’s electronic surveillance manual explicitly suggests that triggerfish may be used to avoid restrictions in statutes like CALEA that bar the use of pen register or trap-and-trace devices—which allow tracking of incoming and outgoing calls from a phone subject to much less stringent evidentiary standards—to gather location data. “By its very terms,” according to the manual, “this prohibition applies only to information collected by a provider and not to information collected directly by law enforcement authorities.Thus, CALEA does not bar the use of pen/trap orders to authorize the use of cell phone tracking devices used to locate targeted cell phones.”

Read more here.