Suppling the Nation with Toll Frees

The supply of toll free numbers is very low. One may think of the thousands of combinations that can be drawn from toll free numbers but there is such a high demand that the supply starts running low and people stop releasing numbers. In turn, new businesses and others have the toughest time trying to find themselves a number. The 800 area code is tough enough to get in the first place but having very few options is even worse. Most toll free companies try to get rid of most area codes before giving up their 800’s so be weary. Read more here.

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Toll Free Number Pool Increasingly Scarce

An unprecedented decrease in the availability of 1-800 numbers has business owners and organizations nationwide scrambling to subscribe for toll free service.

With more than 8,000 toll free numbers registered each day, the supply of available numbers is quickly depleting. This scarcity is causing a rush to obtain new toll free numbers or obtain disconnected numbers returned back to the system.

Read more here.

Contrary to What Some Would Like You to Think, 800 Supplies Dangerously Low

With more than 8,000 toll free numbers registered each day, the supply of available numbers is quickly depleting. This scarcity is causing a rush to obtain new toll free numbers or obtain disconnected numbers returned back to the system.

Toll free numbers were introduced in 1967. By the 1980s, nearly half of all long distance calls would be toll free. Today, 98 percent of adults say they regularly use toll free numbers. Meanwhile, the supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are at an all-time low. More than two-thirds of the available numbers are taken and there are no immediate plans by the Federal Communications Commission to introduce a new pre-fix.

Read more here.

1-800 Number Supply Dramatically Reduced

With more than 8,000 toll free numbers registered each day, the supply of available numbers is quickly depleting. This scarcity is causing a rush to obtain new toll free numbers or obtain disconnected numbers returned back to the system.

Toll free numbers were introduced in 1967. By the 1980s, nearly half of all long distance calls would be toll free. Today, 98 percent of adults say they regularly use toll free numbers. Meanwhile, the supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are at an all-time low.

Read more here.

Toll Free 1-800 Number Supply Dwindling

When a 1-800 number is disconnected and cooled-off, it is returned to the database and becomes instantly in demand. Waiting for a “perfect” retired number is a mistake. Only a small percentage of used numbers become available each year; and new unused numbers are going fast. The most cost effective and efficient way to secure a toll free number is to contact a reputable service provider such as the ones listed on https://smsgov.com/companies/ for example. With these types of services, securing a number can be completed by phone or on the website in just minutes.

Read more here.

Disconnected 800 Numbers Becoming Less Common

When a 1-800 number is disconnected and cooled-off, it is returned to the database and becomes instantly in demand. Waiting for a “perfect” retired number is a mistake. Only a small percentage of used numbers become available each year; and new unused numbers are going fast. The most cost effective and efficient way to secure a toll free number is to contact a reputable service provider such as the ones listed on https://smsgov.com/companies/ for example. With these types of services, securing a number can be completed by phone or on the website in just minutes.

Read more here.

Reservoir of Toll Free 1-800 Numbers Reache An All-Time Low

Toll free numbers were introduced in 1967. By the 1980s, nearly half of all long distance calls would be toll free. Today, 98 percent of adults say they regularly use toll free numbers. Meanwhile, the supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are at an all-time low. More than two-thirds of the available numbers are taken and there are no immediate plans by the Federal Communications Commission to introduce a new pre-fix.

Read more here.

1-800 Supply at Record Low

Toll free numbers were introduced in 1967. By the 1980s, nearly half of all long distance calls would be toll free. Today, 98 percent of adults say they regularly use toll free numbers. Meanwhile, the supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are at an all-time low. More than two-thirds of the available numbers are taken and there are no immediate plans by the Federal Communications Commission to introduce a new pre-fix.

Read more here.

Forget Naysayers, 800 Pool Continues to Shrink

Toll free numbers were introduced in 1967. By the 1980s, nearly half of all long distance calls would be toll free. Today, 98 percent of adults say they regularly use toll free numbers. Meanwhile, the supply of 800, 888, 877, and 866 numbers are at an all-time low. More than two-thirds of the available numbers are taken and there are no immediate plans by the Federal Communications Commission to introduce a new pre-fix.

Read more here.

Toll Free Shortage Worsens

But the limited availability of toll free numbers could have an impact on small business owners. The supply is the lowest it has ever been, while popularity of 1-800 numbers is soaring. Insiders fear that customers waiting to secure a toll free 1-800 number or vanity number may find the supply of suitable numbers gone.

Read more here.