Chain Stores Boost Sales with Toll Free Ordering

Economic stress in late 2008 and 2009 has led to the closings of thousands of retail stores. Nonetheless, many of these companies have stayed profitable through phone and web sales. The majority of sales from catalog and websites are still made through toll free phone calls. And these days, large chain stores like WalMart and Target offer shoppers the convenience of buying over the phone (800-966-6546 WalMart; 800-440-0680, Target). Toll free has helped many retail companies, large and small, stay afloat during this recession.

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T.A.C. Discusses Shortages

During a recent discussion with members of the Tollfree Advisory Committee, it was agreed that if the database of toll free numbers isn’t beefed up soon, the finite supply of toll free numbers could run out. Last year, a plea for the deactivation of unused 800 numbers resulted in a temporary surge of numbers returned to the main database. But despite these mass replacements, the supply of available toll free numbers continues to dwindle as thousands of subscribers register for a toll free number each day. It’s time for some action.

Toll Free Keeps Stressed Businesses Afloat

Economic stress in late 2009 and the first half of 2010 has led to the closings of thousands of retail stores. Nonetheless, many of these companies have stayed profitable through phone and web sales. The majority of sales from catalog and websites are still made through toll free phone calls. And these days, large chain stores like WalMart and Target offer shoppers the convenience of buying over the phone (800-966-6546 WalMart; 800-440-0680, Target). Toll free has helped many retail companies, large and small, stay afloat during this recession.

FCC Exercise Control Over Toll Free Use

After a recent blog post on regulation, a reader requested an example of how regulators have controlled the improper use of toll free numbers. Here’s one: In 2005, the FCC yanked control of 1-800-RED-CROSS from a private California business owner who was leasing the use of the number to local chapters of the Red Cross. When the charity filed a formal complaint, the FCC determined that the brokering was illegal and handed over control of the number to the non-profit.

Legal Ownership Of Toll Free

This seems to be a hot topic these days. Under rules established in 1997 by the FCC, toll-free service providers cannot reserve a toll-free number without having an actual toll-free subscriber for whom the number is being reserved. By law, available numbers must be doled out on a first-come, first served basis off the main database maintained by the 800 Service Management System (SMS/800). Hoarding numbers is likewise illegal. A subscriber may not acquire more toll-free numbers than they intend to use. By FCC definition, “hoarding” also includes “brokering” which is the illegal lease or sale of toll-free numbers for a fee.

Toll Free Numbers Help Preserve Profits

Economic stress starting in late 2008 and the continuing through 2009 has led to the closings of thousands of retail stores. Nonetheless, many of these companies have stayed profitable through phone and web sales. The majority of sales from catalog and websites are still made through toll free phone calls. And these days, large chain stores like WalMart and Target offer shoppers the convenience of buying over the phone (800-966-6546 WalMart; 800-440-0680, Target). Toll free has helped many retail companies, large and small, stay afloat during this recession.

FCC Regulated Toll Free Ownership

After a recent blog post on regulation, a reader requested an example of how regulators have controlled the improper use of toll free numbers. Here’s one: In 2005, the FCC yanked control of 1-800-RED-CROSS from a private California business owner who was leasing the use of the number to local chapters of the Red Cross. When the charity filed a formal complaint, the FCC determined that the brokering was illegal and handed over control of the number to the non-profit.

The FCC Laws Are Clear

This seems to be a hot topic these days. Under rules established in 1997 by the FCC, toll-free service providers cannot reserve a toll-free number without having an actual toll-free subscriber for whom the number is being reserved. By law, available numbers must be doled out on a first-come, first served basis off the main database maintained by the 800 Service Management System (SMS/800). Hoarding numbers is likewise illegal. A subscriber may not acquire more toll-free numbers than they intend to use. By FCC definition, “hoarding” also includes “brokering” which is the illegal lease or sale of toll-free numbers for a fee.

Toll Frees Help Keep Profits Up

Economic stress in late 2008 and 2009 has led to the closings of thousands of retail stores. Nonetheless, many of these companies have stayed profitable through phone and web sales. The majority of sales from catalog and websites are still made through toll free phone calls. And these days, large chain stores like WalMart and Target offer shoppers the convenience of buying over the phone (800-966-6546 WalMart; 800-440-0680, Target). Toll free has helped many retail companies, large and small, stay afloat during this recession.

FCC Exercises Control Over Toll Free Numbers

After a recent blog post on regulation, a reader requested an example of how regulators have controlled the improper use of toll free numbers. Here’s one: In 2005, the FCC yanked control of 1-800-RED-CROSS from a private California business owner who was leasing the use of the number to local chapters of the Red Cross. When the charity filed a formal complaint, the FCC determined that the brokering was illegal and handed over control of the number to the non-profit.